[Grantees] 2014 Teen Read Week Grantee Space

This space is intended for the use of the grantees of the 2014 Teen Read Week activity grant.

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That is a great idea! Let me know how the surveys go; we have tried this in the past (even offering prize incentives) and we got very little feedback.

I am right there with you in trying to get more teens into the library. My local high school has the IB program so I thought "cool, they will really want to be involved." As it turns out, many of those kids have so much homework that when they have free time, library programs are not their first choice. I have five IB students in the program we are doing for TRW and they are so awesome, but I know once school starts on Monday I am going to see a lot less of them.

Hello! My name is Alyssa Newton and I am the Teen Librarian at the Onondaga Free Library in Syracuse, NY. We are thrilled to win the Teen Read Week grant and love this year’s theme!

In support of the theme, my library will be hosting special events for teens to explore their dream jobs and careers and spotlighting the career and college-bound resources at the library.  In addition, the library will feature titles that inspire teens to pursue a career in the Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM) professions, highlighting titles in both the Young Adult fiction and non-fiction collections. During Summer Reading we had many successful STEAM programs and hope to build off of that success.

Finally, to supplement the teens’ reading and exploration, the library will host a Human Library event, inviting professionals in the STEAM fields to meet one-on-one with teens to discuss their career paths. A “Human Library” is an innovative program designed to promote dialogue, allowing community members to speak informally with “people on loan.” The STEAM Human Library allows teens to meet with professionals from STEAM fields including, but not limited to doctors, nurses, engineers, artists/musicians, computer programmers and environmental biologists.

I have read about human libraries and think they are brilliant. I love seeing so many libraries offer career fairs for teens; this is a great way to get local high schools involved in conversations with public librarians and, hopefully, develop long-term relationships.

I tried to get a STEAM competition going last year and just did not have the local interest/ high school contacts at the time to pull off such an involved event. I am going to try to aim for it this year (April) since I have a few more high school contacts who seem excited about partnering with us on more programs. I want to develop this program with the teachers as opposed to designing it for them. 

Would love to see how this goes! Great ideas!

Alyssa Newton said:

Hello! My name is Alyssa Newton and I am the Teen Librarian at the Onondaga Free Library in Syracuse, NY. We are thrilled to win the Teen Read Week grant and love this year’s theme!

In support of the theme, my library will be hosting special events for teens to explore their dream jobs and careers and spotlighting the career and college-bound resources at the library.  In addition, the library will feature titles that inspire teens to pursue a career in the Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM) professions, highlighting titles in both the Young Adult fiction and non-fiction collections. During Summer Reading we had many successful STEAM programs and hope to build off of that success.

Finally, to supplement the teens’ reading and exploration, the library will host a Human Library event, inviting professionals in the STEAM fields to meet one-on-one with teens to discuss their career paths. A “Human Library” is an innovative program designed to promote dialogue, allowing community members to speak informally with “people on loan.” The STEAM Human Library allows teens to meet with professionals from STEAM fields including, but not limited to doctors, nurses, engineers, artists/musicians, computer programmers and environmental biologists.

We had the first round of auditions for our play last night; it was pretty intense. I had the teens who wrote the play act the scenes out with the potential actors and tried to keep track of how long each scene took. We are aiming to have each act last about 10-15 minutes, so if reading took 8-9 minutes we were good to go. 

We didn't have as many actors as I had hoped would show up, but I had heard from some of my teens that their friends were not going to be able to meet any of our audition dates due to school programs and sports. I also had most, if not all, of our writers volunteer to act out remaining roles. 

I have been pushing the teens to get the writing portion done since we are a bit behind in that area. I think, after seeing the actors show up last night, our writers were a bit more encouraged to get a move on the writing and finalizing the script. Overall, it was a fun experience and it was nice to see my teen writers bring their friends into the library to enjoy what they enjoy. My favorite part of the night was when we had a young man say he didn't want to act (he wanted to do technical assistance), but after reading the role for the Mad Hatter, he was sold on acting in the play. 

Hi! My name is Gail Zachariah. I'm the Head of Youth and Community Services at the Keene Public Library In Keene, N.H. Keene is a small town of about 23,000 and we are super excited to be able to offer some really cool programs thanks to our Teen Read Grant. We are mainly focusing on graphic novels and are working with Marek Bennett, a N.H. based comic book artist and a local theatre group. Primarily, our programs start on October 11 which is also Star Wars Reads Day so we will do some Star Wars Activities too. Marek will offer a comic book workshop at noon, which will then kick off a mini comic book marathon from noon until midnight when kids can work on projects during our 12 Hours Comics session. That Saturday is really busy for us because our teens and community members are putting on a staged reading of the IDW comic book Kill Shakespeare. Technically, we have already begun our Teen Read Week programming because we have started rehearsals and last week for Banned Books Week, Marek spoke to teens about challenges and censorship about graphic novels. This was eye-opening, 

Thanks so much to YALSA and Dollar General who has made all of these great programs possible!!

Attachments:

Hi Kayla,

Teens are busy. We had the same thing happen at our play so I'm taking a role too. Our play include teens, library staff, and volunteers.

Gail Zachariah, Keene Public Library

Kayla Kuni said:

We had the first round of auditions for our play last night; it was pretty intense. I had the teens who wrote the play act the scenes out with the potential actors and tried to keep track of how long each scene took. We are aiming to have each act last about 10-15 minutes, so if reading took 8-9 minutes we were good to go. 

We didn't have as many actors as I had hoped would show up, but I had heard from some of my teens that their friends were not going to be able to meet any of our audition dates due to school programs and sports. I also had most, if not all, of our writers volunteer to act out remaining roles. 

I have been pushing the teens to get the writing portion done since we are a bit behind in that area. I think, after seeing the actors show up last night, our writers were a bit more encouraged to get a move on the writing and finalizing the script. Overall, it was a fun experience and it was nice to see my teen writers bring their friends into the library to enjoy what they enjoy. My favorite part of the night was when we had a young man say he didn't want to act (he wanted to do technical assistance), but after reading the role for the Mad Hatter, he was sold on acting in the play. 

Gail,

This week has been pretty crazy for our play. The venue we picked was a local high school. I figured it would be great to get them to partner with us on the event and they were excited to as well. However, three weeks from the date of our play, the stage we were originally told we could use was no longer available. There was a mis-communication about the room and how long it would be used for testing and, unfortunately for us, this issue with double booking did not come to light until last week. Thankfully, I had booked the library meeting rooms as a back-up location. The problem of course is that we had been marketing it as being at this high school for a few weeks and now I have to un-do all of that. 

So far, the teens are doing well. I am somewhat concerned about them remembering their lines since they do have so much going on in their lives. I am also worried because I will not be at two dress rehearsals this week since I will be presenting a poster at SELA's conference. Overall, I know this thing is going to be great and I feel I have achieved a lot already. I have teens reading books they had never heard of before because they all wanted to read these books before the play. For us, Teen Read Week has been Teens Reading Since June to Celebrate TRW.

Kayla,

We've had problems with coordinating with our high school too. I really wanted our play to be an evening play but the only time when could offer it that wouldn't compete with homecoming or other scheduling issues was during the afternoon. I know it will be great and the teens that are participating are getting a lot out of it. I missed on practice too. But we had a good one tonight and a few more before our performance. Good luck with your play!

These late night practices for Kill Shakespeare are so much fun. I'm so glad we are putting on this stage reading for TRW!

http://www.tampabay.com/news/briefs/teens-to-perform-mash-up-play-i...

This is the article we had in the paper prior to our play. A reporter form the Suncoast Times also plans on coming to cover the event on Monday night.

And these are some photos. I have consent forms from all but two teens and I will get those to you guys as soon as I get the final two in. I have some pictures from the past week that have also not made it online yet, but hopefully they will be up some time today.

They have all worked really hard. They asked for an additional meeting tonight (after we close) to get together and get their places set properly. 

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.677730848982848.107374185...

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Join this Teen Read Week website for great resources and opportunities such as:

  • A low-res download of the 2014 TRW themed logo (found under the planning tab - must be signed into account)
  • Free access to a webinar about leveraging TRW to promote career & college readiness with your teen patrons. The recording can be found on the Webinar page under the Planning tab. (Must be signed in to view)
  • Alerts about grant opportunities
  • More perks to come so be sure to register and check back for updates!

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